How to Box to Win, How to Build Muscle, How to Breathe, Stand, Wald, or Run, How to Punch the Bag; A Book of Health and Strength

How to Box to Win, How to Build Muscle, How to Breathe, Stand, Wald, or Run, How to Punch the Bag; A Book of Health and Strength

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1920 edition. Excerpt: ...maybe snapped----my newly-acquired health. All this 'was not in my line. Certain people may thrive on it, but I believe my course to be by far the better and less perilous. My plan was to increase my strength and endurance in a perfectly natural way. I had, ever since I began to train, carried constantly with me a grip machine, consisting of two cylindrical bits of wood, working on an elastic spring. This I held in one hand or the other, all the time, while walking, resting, or riding. I pressed it constantly, until it became a second nature to me to do so, and at last I did so unconsciously. I thus worked the grip machine thousands of times a day without the slightest trouble. This strengthened the muscles of hands, wrists, and forearm to an incredible extent and without putting me to the least inconvenience. I began now to increase my gymnasium work. I realized that I was training to fight a man far heavier than I, and I knew how much it jars and tires a r_nan to hit a heavier opponent. To hit such a man hard and fre quently takes more out of one than to receive an almost equal number of blows. I studied the thing out and found that, while the hitting of blows like that against an unyielding, massive surface jars the whole body, yet the principal strain comes on the thighs. The thighs then must be strengthened to withstand the shock, as must the whole body.. But how? Few people realize that the reason a tired fighter's legs begin to wabble is usually because his thigh muscles are exhausted. Yet it is true. Here is the plan I adopted to strengthen these: I procured an eighty-five-pound punching bag. This bag was of much the same size, shape, and general appearance as a leather mail pouch. I began punching it regularly, every...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 32 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 77g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236916247
  • 9781236916242