How Botha and Smuts Conquered German South West; A Full Record of the Campaign from Official Information by Reuter's Special War Correspondents Who Accompanied the Forces Sent by the Government of the Union of South Africa

How Botha and Smuts Conquered German South West; A Full Record of the Campaign from Official Information by Reuter's Special War Correspondents Who Accompanied the Forces Sent by the Government of the Union of South Africa

By (author) 

List price: US$18.51

Currently unavailable

We can notify you when this item is back in stock

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1916 edition. Excerpt: ...banner, and the rebels the Vierkleur, or old Bepublican flag. Apropos of this and the agreement already quoted, Mr. Merriman, addressing a public meeting at Beaufort West on October 28 of that year, ridiculed Maritz's agreement with the Germans, saying that nobody in his sober senses could imagine the Germans were going to spend money and give men to help to set up the old Vierkleur flag of the Transvaal Bepublic. What might happen was that the Vierkleur might be hoisted, but the German flag would be hoisted above it. He added that if this country was not a Bepublic, it was as good an imitation of a Republic as could be got, and this was the system of Great Britain. At this same gathering Mr. Merriman referred to an interesting meeting which had just recently taken place between General Botha and himself. Not forty-eight hours before, he said, he was shaking General Botha's hand as he was going out to head the forces in the field. He (Mr. Merriman) had then taken the liberty to remonstrate with him, saying his life was too valuable to the country to be risked. To this General Botha had replied, with deep emotion, that he did not ask his people to enter into armed conflict with their brethren unless he led them. That was a noble sentiment, which, said Mr. Merriman, ought to be laid to heart by every man in the country. A junior commander took over the reduced situation from Col. Brits, who was required to quell bigger rebellious happenings in other parts of the Union. No sooner, however, had Col. Ben Bouwer assumed the reins at Kakamas than news came that Kemp, with a large following of rebels, was scuttling across country from the direction of Kuruman, with the intention of skirting Upington in an attempt to join hands with Maritz in German...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 134 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 254g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United Kingdom
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236548191
  • 9781236548191