The House Book; Combining Medicine, Cookery, Diet, General Economy, Health, Sea-Bathing, Gardening, Manufactures, Arts, Etc., ... Including Upwards of

The House Book; Combining Medicine, Cookery, Diet, General Economy, Health, Sea-Bathing, Gardening, Manufactures, Arts, Etc., ... Including Upwards of

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1826 edition. Excerpt: ...is called a " consent of parts " that is when one part (suppdse the skin) is afl'ected, the other, the stomach and bowels) syrnpathises, as it were, and ta es on an analogous action. Also between the skin and liver, or in other words, between the perspiration and biliary secretion there exists one of the strongest sympathies in the, human frame. This is a consideration of the first practical importarice, not only in the cure of cutaneous diseases, but of bilious, dyspeptic, and other complaints; for by direct(ing our 0p6lE3.Ill0l1iS, observes Sir Arthur Clarke-(,1 towar s any one,0 t e 'unctions in question, we can eclsively influence the other. For example, the vapour bath, or James' powders, by producing a perspiration, increases the secretion of bile; and mercury, while it promotes the secretion of bile, increases at the same time the insensible perspiration. ' This consent of parts between the skin and liver, accounts for the augmented secretion of bile in warm weather and in hot climates, corresponding with the increased perspiration. ' ' Eruptions on the skin, particularly those on the face, are commonly the consequence of some previous affection of the liver, or of the alimentary canal; and arise from sympathy between those organs and the skin. They are often mistaken eruptions and as such treated without any efl'ect. Their cause is sometimes very obscure, but they are almost always traced to some circumstance which has obstructed or checked the sensible or insensible perspiration: hence it must be obvious, that in all eruptive complaints, the Barege, or medicated warm-bath Dr. Buclzan on Cold Sea-Bathing. ' 297 (see p. 264-5) promises relief, and must be considered the most-powerful auxiliary'-in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 222 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 404g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236831217
  • 9781236831217