Hortus Jamaicensis, Or, a Botanical Description, (According to the Linnean System) and an Account of the Virtues, &C., of Its Indigenous Plants Hitherto Known, as Also of the Most Useful Exotics - Compiled from the Best Authorities, and

Hortus Jamaicensis, Or, a Botanical Description, (According to the Linnean System) and an Account of the Virtues, &C., of Its Indigenous Plants Hitherto Known, as Also of the Most Useful Exotics - Compiled from the Best Authorities, and

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1814 edition. Excerpt: ...of a cooling and agreeable nature, but is the less esteemed on account of its being so common. Taken on an empty stomach it has been known to cure obs inate intermittents. A clecoition of the roots is given in Guadaloupe as a cure for the poison offish. Being reduced to powder, the root snuffed up the nose, Grainger says, produces the same effect as to'mcco; and, taken by the mouth, the Indians pretend it is a specific in the epilepsy. The leaves are commonly thrown into fowl-houses for the purpose of destroying fowl-lice. Moane says, " when they are unripe, and about the bigness of turnips, if so dressed they eat like them Of the unripe fruit pressed is made a wine, which is as clear as water, and is good for fluxes and cankers in childrens mouths. The leaves infused, according to Piso, or burned and mixed with oil, being rubbed into an apos-. theme, ripens, opens, and heals it/' 2. SQUAMMOSA. SCALY. jlnnona foliis odoratis mir.oribus, fructu conwide squammesa paivx dulci Sloane, v. 2, p 16$, t. 227. Fohis obi ngo-matis undulatis vevosis, flvribus tripetalis fmctibus mamillatis. Browne, p. 256, Leaves oblong, acute, smooth; fruits obtusely scaled, outer petals lanceolate, inner ones minute. The sweet sop, or sugar-apple tree, gr6ws only about eight feet in height, and is frequently rather a shrub; the trunk is smooth, and the branches spreading and round leaves alternate, acuminate, entire, nerved, smooth on both sides, glaucous on tlie back; petioles short, round, smooth, thickened at the base. I'iowtrs peduncled, usually in pairs, oblong, acuminate, green without, whitish within; peduncles below the petioles, longer, one-rlowered. Calyx one-leafed, triangular; petals three, lanceolate, triquetrous, plane-convex without, sharp at the top, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 182 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 336g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236581768
  • 9781236581761