Horrors of Slavery and Other Writings

Horrors of Slavery and Other Writings

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Description

"Horrors of Slavery" records the history, ideas and rhetoric of Robert Wedderburn, a Scottish-West Indian slave offspring who lived an extraordinary life in the slums of Georgian and Regency London. Working successively as a sailor, tailor, thief, prophet, blasphemous preacher, revolutionary conspirator and bawdy house keeper, Robert Wedderburn was a key figure in the insurrectionary ferment of the French wars and Reform agitation. His writings include abolitionist autobiography, prophetic piety, radical journalism and colloquial speeches transcribed by government spies and undercover police. Together they reveal the world of a poor mulatto immigrant striving to liberate the enslaved in the West Indies and Britain, as well as convince London's artisan ultra-radicals of the affinities between black West Indian and English working-class revolution.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 160 pages
  • 138 x 216mm | 252g
  • EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY PRESS
  • Edinburgh, United Kingdom
  • 0748603638
  • 9780748603633

Table of contents

Part 1 The crucible of slavery: "The Horrors of Slavery, exemplified in the Life and History of the Rev Robert Wedderburn", 1824. Part 2 The making of a radical prophet: Robert Wedderburn, "Truth Self-Supported, or a Refutation of Certain Doctrinal Errors Generally Adopted in the Christian Church"; Robert Wedderburn to Francis Place, Giltspur St Prison, 22 March 1831. Part 3 Jamaican-British revolutionary: "The Axe Laid To the Root, or A Fatal Blow to Oppressors"; "The Axe Laid to the Root, No 2"; "The Axe Laid to the Root, No 4"; "The Axe Laid to the Root, No 6". Part 4 Insurrectionary preacher: "Can it be Murder to Kill a Tyrant?", handbill; misc shorter writings. Part 5 Infidel: the address of Rev R Wedderburn, to the Court of the King's Bench at Westminster, on appearing to receive Judgement for Blasphemy; "Cast Iron Parsons, or Hints to the Public and Legislature, on Political Economy"; "The Lion", 21 March 1828, "The Holy Liturgy, of Divine Service, upon the Principle of Pure Christian Diabolism..."show more