A History of the Whig Party, or Some of Its Main Features; With a Hurried Glance at the Formation of Parties in the United States, and the Outlines of the History of the Principal Parties of the Country to the Present Time, Etc. Etc

A History of the Whig Party, or Some of Its Main Features; With a Hurried Glance at the Formation of Parties in the United States, and the Outlines of the History of the Principal Parties of the Country to the Present Time, Etc. Etc

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1860 edition. Excerpt: ...and Briggs. George Evans, John Bell, Thomas Corwin, Thomas Ewing, S. F. Vinton, Theodore Frelinghuysen, Samuel Prentiss, Millard Fillmore, and many more might be named who led in the National Republican ranks in Congress. Mr. Benton, in his Thirty Years in the United States Senate, is not very minute as to his views and course on the prominent measures of his day prior to the Twenty-second Congress, but contents himself with an ample display of his championship of the Democratic measures of that and the subsequent period of his senatorial life. The National Republicans, as the Clay and Adams party were at first termed, or Whigs, as they were afterwards called, and as we will hereafter call them, greatly annoyed and embarrassed the Democrats, as we will hereafter style the other party, by making political issues, and putting forth principles and measures as party tests. The United States Bank, Internal Improvements, the Tariff, &c., were at once unfurled upon the Whig banners, and the advocacy of these measures was claimed as the distinctive characteristic of the Whig party. This was regarded as unfair by Jackson and his friends, as the most of them were or had been favorable to, and had sustained, these measures. It was supposed by the Whigs that the administration, were it to change front on such long-mooted, and, as was thought, finally settled systems of 'policy, would bring upon itself certain destruction. It was supposed that the people were competent to weigh and correctly decide questions of national policy, and that a departure by the administration from what the clearestminded statesmen had demonstrated, and the experience of the past had established, to be for the best interests of the country, would bring down upon it...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 104 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 200g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123685456X
  • 9781236854568