History of West Virginia.- V. 2-3. Family and Personal History

History of West Virginia.- V. 2-3. Family and Personal History

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1913 edition. Excerpt: ... designed to obstruct or embarrass the execution of the Fugitive Slave Law, they have in every instance been wholly disregarded by the judges and officers of the United States, and this law by them faithfully enforced: that it is the duty of all good citizens and lovers of our common country, to sink all party passion, prejudices and rivalries, to let by-gones be by-gones, and to give all their united energies and efforts to maintain and support our present Constitution and Union, and to effect such settlement or adjustment of all the matters heretofore preventing grounds for controversy by amendments of the Constitution or otherwise, as shall restore peace and harmony, and be sufficient to secure us a future from all continuance or renewal of the same controversies: and that "although we deplore the election of Abraham Lincoln to the presidency as calculated to impair the harmony of the Union, nevertheless, such a movement does not, in our judgment, justify secession, or a dissolution of our blessed and glorious Union." On January 1st, 1861, there was held a large mass-meeting at Park ersburg--the greatest gathering ever held in the county. Speeches were made by General James J. Jackson, J. M. Stephenson, W. J. Boreman and others. The resolutions declared that "the doctrine of secession of a state has no warrant in the Constitution, and that such a doctrine would be fatal to the Union and all the purposes of its creation, and that in the judgment of this meeting secession is revolution; and, while we fully admit the doctrine and right of revolution for the great causes set forth in the Declaration of Independence, or for others of equal force, and while we are grieved to say that this government, especially several of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 398 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 21mm | 708g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236929675
  • 9781236929679