History of the West Indies; British Guiana, Barbadoes, St. Vincent's, St. Lucia, Dominica, Montserrat, Antigua, St. Christopher's, &C., &C Volume 2

History of the West Indies; British Guiana, Barbadoes, St. Vincent's, St. Lucia, Dominica, Montserrat, Antigua, St. Christopher's, &C., &C Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1837 edition. Excerpt: ... Dutch have their Lutheran church and minister, the Romish their chapel and minister, all paid (as I before said) and supported by the colony; and there are several active and useful missionaries endeavouring to instil Christianity into the negro population. Of the creed of the Indians we know little. Mr. Hillhouse says, that they acknowledge the existence of a superior Divinity, the universal Creator; and most tribes also believe in a subservient power, whose particular province is the protection of their nation. Amongst CARIB IDEAS OP THE SUPREME BEING. 159 the Arawaaks, Aluberi is the Supreme Being, and Kururumanny the god or patron of the Arawaak nation. Woorecaddo and Emehsewaddo are the wives of Kururumanny; one signifying a worker in darkness, and the other the couchy, or large red ant, that burrows in the earth: together, they are typical of the creation of all things out of the earth in the dark. The great and just Creator is believed to be incapable of wantonly afflicting the works of his hands; and, as his power and unearthly nature place him above the requisition of services from mortals, they conceive that prayers or adoration are superfluous--his will being independent of the wants or caprices of mankind. They laugh at the idea of the supreme power being propitiated by the supplications of individual interest, because they say he is supremely just, and that if he hears the prayers of one, he is bound to hear all; and, as the interests of one individual are always interfering with the interests of others, so, to prevent unjust precedence, he will be influenced by no supplications, but execute his own will, without deigning to consult that of mortals. The Caribisce and Accawai call their god Maconaima, also signifying one that works...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 78 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236580443
  • 9781236580443