The History of Volcanic Action in the Area of the British Isles; Being the Anniversary Presidential Addresses to the Geological Society of London in the Years 1891, 1892

The History of Volcanic Action in the Area of the British Isles; Being the Anniversary Presidential Addresses to the Geological Society of London in the Years 1891, 1892

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1891 edition. Excerpt: ...where their probable stratigraphical horizon can be recognized or inferred, they are found to belong to parts of the series considerably above the base of the whole. They point to the gradual sinking of the basin and the creeping of the waters with their littoral shingles farther and farther up the slopes of the hills on either side. But this is not all the evidence that can be adduced to show that the limits of the lake extended considerably beyond the lines of dislocation between which the present area of Old Red Sandstone mainly lies. No one can look at the noble escarpments of the Braes of Donne on the one side, or walk over the upturned conglomerates and porphyrites which flank the Lanarkshire uplands on the other, without being convinced that if the effects of the boundary-faults could be undone, so as to restore these rocks to their original positions, their prolongations, now removed by denudation, would be found sweeping far into the Highlands on the north and into the Silurian uplands on the south. If the area of Lake Caledonia' were taken to be defined by the boundary-faults, it covered a space of about 10,000 square miles. But, as we know that it certainly stretched beyond the limits marked by these faults, it must have been of still greater extent. We shall probably not exaggerate if we regard it as somewhat larger than the present Lake Erie, the superficies of which is about 9900 square. miles. In this long narrow basin the remarkable volcanic history was enacted of which I now proceed to give some account. The Lower Old Red Sandstone of Central Scotland may be con veniently dividcd into three great groups, each of which marks a ' distinct epoch in the history of the basin wherein they were successively accumulated....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 94 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 181g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236990749
  • 9781236990747