A History of Vermont, from Its First Settlement to the Present Time; With a Geographical Account of the Country, and a View of Its Original Inhabitants for the Use of Schools

A History of Vermont, from Its First Settlement to the Present Time; With a Geographical Account of the Country, and a View of Its Original Inhabitants for the Use of Schools

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1828 edition. Excerpt: ...of Vermont, and had in communications with the Secretary, treated it as an independent State.. March 12,1778, ii petition was presented to the Assembly of Vermont, from sixteen towns in New-Hampshire, declaring that they were unconnected with any State, and requesting to be admitted into union and confederation with them. The original charter of New-Hampshire extended only 60 miles from the sea coast. All lands west of this were annexed to it only by royal commissions. The petitioners contended that these could be of force no longer than while the power of the Crown subsisted, and had now expired with the royal authority; that it consequently devolved upon the people to determine to what government they should hereafter belong. Sec. 2. This application was very embarrassing to the Assembly of Vermont.--1. What was the statenffeellnj between New-Hampthire and Vermont? What petition was presented to Vermont March 12? What did they contend fori 2. How did it affect the Assembly? How was it decided? What did thu cause New-Hampshire to do? What measures were taken? Those from the towns on Connecticut river were in favour of receiving them; while those from west of the mountains were opposed to it. It was finally referred to a vote of the people, and from the management of those in favour of the measure, a majority were secured for it. June 11, a vote was carried admitting the sixteen towns, and also any others, on a vote of the majority of the inhabitants, and on their sending a representative to the Assembly. These measures of course were alarming to New-Hampshire. The governor addressed a letter to Chittenden, governor of Vermont, claiming the sixteen towns, and urging him to use his influence with the Assembly to dissolve so irregular and dangerous..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 34 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236657594
  • 9781236657596