The History of Vartam and of the Battle of Armenians; Containing an Account of the Religious Wars Between the Persians and Armenians

The History of Vartam and of the Battle of Armenians; Containing an Account of the Religious Wars Between the Persians and Armenians

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1830 edition. Excerpt: ...disposed; for hardly would the foes have dared to behold with their own eyes our dangerous league, had they not found an entrance in many places. Wherever dissension insinuates itself, all union must cease; heavenly virtue vanisheth, and those, whose minds are more elevated, utter mournful tones. Do we weep over a corpse, over the separation of a limb from the holy body (of the church), and shall we not be filled with still greater tribulation over those whose bodies and souls together die? And if we so mourn for a single soul, how much more for those of a whole race? But these, our lamentations, resound not for a race alone, but for many races and provinces, which I will mention in succession, although there is no pleasure in so doing. Truly, with reluctance do I describe all this: --how some, for the sake of their lives, fell away from the faith and caused the apostacy of many others: how some also did this only in appearance, others again both in appearance and reality. But the heaviest curse of all is, that the gates of perdition, which they thus have opened, none save God alone can close again--the entrance is all that is given to man. Notwithstanding that the unbeliever Mihrnerseh was already convinced of the ungodliness of Vasag, yet he now sent to him, and had him brought into his presence. As he had, before this time, separated himself from the Armenian league, he obeyed the summons forthwith, assured Mihrnerseh of his fidelity, and gave an account of the insurrection of the Armenians. He related more than was true, and added charges of which the Armenians were wholly innocent, in order that he might make himself appear worthier and dearer to the unbeliever. Though the latter inwardly despised him, still he outwardly distinguished..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 54 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 113g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236897862
  • 9781236897862