The History of the Troubles of Great Britain; Containing a Particular Account of the Most Remarkable Passages in Scotland, from the Year 1633 to 1650. with an Exact Relation of the Wars Carried On, and the Battles Fought by the Marquis of

The History of the Troubles of Great Britain; Containing a Particular Account of the Most Remarkable Passages in Scotland, from the Year 1633 to 1650. with an Exact Relation of the Wars Carried On, and the Battles Fought by the Marquis of

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1738 edition. Excerpt: ...those of the Chapters, and that they ought to have had some considerable Savings, as well of the Taxes that had been laid upon the Counties for subsisting their Armies, as of the voluntary Contributions, and of the Confiscations: Besides these, they had had 1647. Recourse to extraordinary Ways and Means, having made a Capitation J-VN. over.all the Kingdom, and obliged all the Families in London to retrench a Meal every Week, and to pay the Value of it to the Parliament. So that it was easy to prove, that by all these Methods the Parliament had disposed of more than thirty nine Millions of Pounds since the Beginning of the War. That shewed plainly, that the publick Neceffity could not proceed but from a prodigious squandering away of the Revenues; and that some private Persons had inriched themselves extraordinarily at the ' Expences of the Publick. Besides, it was very evident, that two hundred and eighty three thousand, three hundred and thirty three Pounds, six Shillings, and eight Pence had been distributed amongst the Mem ers of the two Houses, as well to make amends for their Losses, as in Consideration of their Services, besides what had been purloined by those who had the Management of the publick Money. For it may easily be believed, that these People did not forget themselves; and that there was no Device but what they made use of in order to have a large Share of the Revenues, since they went so far as to buy old Pensions, that had been almost forgot, of which they paid themselves the Arrears, was only for Form-sake, for the Commiffioners that were named by those Members, were more obliged than the others to be accountable themselves, which made the Thing to be the more suspected. And without doubt, had they meant honestly, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 250 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 13mm | 454g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236819748
  • 9781236819741