A History of Travel in America; Being an Outline of the Development in Modes of Travel from Archaic Vehicles of Colonial Times to the Completion of the First Transcontinental Railroad

A History of Travel in America; Being an Outline of the Development in Modes of Travel from Archaic Vehicles of Colonial Times to the Completion of the First Transcontinental Railroad : The Influence of the Indians on the Free Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1915 edition. Excerpt: ...President. The application of the statute to the Cherokees and Creeks as individuals, and its destruction of Cherokee government, were to occur after the next Federal administration should be in office. Jackson had for some time declared "that if the states chose to 158.--Metallic ticket of a passenger stage line in New York City. Revealing a vehicle similar to some of those portrayed in the preceding illustration, but here called an "omnibus." Date, about 1830-1835. Brass; actual size. extend their laws over them the Indians it would not be in the power of the Federal Government to prevent it."1 By the year 1828 the problem arising from the Indian situation in the South was attracting the attention of the country, and the predicament into which the white race had fallen was recognized. Government exerted its utmost legitimate effort to induce a migration of the four great red nations and the cession of their countries, but without avail. The natives refused either to sell or to go, stood on their treaty rights and demanded protection from invasion in order that they might develop in peace. President Adams' action in behalf of the Creeks prevented any further overt movement by a white state during the remainder of his term of office, but in the last year of his 1 His own language in defining his position. Contained in a message to the Senate under date of February 22, 1831, in answer to the Senate's request for an explanation of his acts and policy toward the Indians. The alteration in Jackson's opinion must, however, have taken place since 1820, for in that year, as a Plenipotentiary of the United States, he had guaranteed the inviolability of the Choctaw possessions until the members of the nation became United...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 222g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236742567
  • 9781236742568