The History, Topography, and Antiquities, of the County and City of Limerick; With a Preliminary View of the History, and Antiquities of Ireland Volume 2

The History, Topography, and Antiquities, of the County and City of Limerick; With a Preliminary View of the History, and Antiquities of Ireland Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1827 edition. Excerpt: ...united with the other bishops of Ireland in a project for depriving King Henry III. of the custody of the temporalities of all sees during vacancies. He was preparing to set out for Rome to plead the cause of the bishops as their agent, when he was cut off by the hand of death, and was succeeded by Robert of Emly, who died in 1273. Several religious houses were established in Limerick during the episcopate of Hubert de Burgh. In 1227, Donagh Carbrac O'Brien founded a magnificent monastery for Dominican Friars, which stood in Barrack-street, in which he, with Hubert de Burgh, and several other prelates were afterwards interred. Through the munificence of another of the O'Brien family, a friary for the Hermits of St. Augustine was erected where the City Court-house now stands. Simon Minor, a wealthy citizen, founded a friary for Regular Canons of St. Augustine at the end of Fishlane; and about the same period William Fion de Burgo, son-in-law to Donald O'Brien, King of Limerick, erected a convent for the Franciscans, upon whose site the old County Court-house was afterwards built. If we except the erection of these religious edifices, the city appears to have improved but little during the first century after its colonization by the English. Its commerce, indeed, would seem to have considerably declined, for the customs of the port of Limerick from Michaelmas in the eighth year of Edward I. to Easter in the tenth year of the same The first settlers in Limerick after the invasion of Henry II. appear to have been a mixture of English, Welsh, Normans, Spaniards, and Italians, as will appear from the following names, peculiar to those several nations, which we find in the list of the magistrates of Limerick during the 13th century--English; Bamberry, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 198 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 363g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123650030X
  • 9781236500304