The History of Thucydides; Newly Tr. Into Englishwith Very Copious Annotationsprefixed, Is an Entirely New Life of Thucydides with a Memoir of the Sta

The History of Thucydides; Newly Tr. Into Englishwith Very Copious Annotationsprefixed, Is an Entirely New Life of Thucydides with a Memoir of the Sta

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1829 edition. Excerpt: ...and fled to the upper city, and afterwards capitulated with Nicias and his colleagues " to leave it to the Athenians to decide concerning them at their liast explains it wpomip/iuxic, Kcu narayuyi/. Hence it is called by Xen. Hist. 4,8,7. the Phcenician post. In the same manner irpoatoXi) is used at 1. 4,1. We may presume that these ships brought corn (which so unfertile a country would require), and such other commodities as the institutions of Sparta would permit to be imported. s Was the less infested, Jc Thus it would have been a great acquisition to the enemy, for Demaratus on Herod. 7,235. (referred to by Poppo Proleg. p. 20.) says it was well adapted for maritime devastation on Laconia. 6 Juts out and stretches.' Or extends itself. The Scholiast well explains it aviiTiivu -rai avairirrraTai, the latter of which terms is very applicable to the form of the island, which is cloven, and to the south it expands itself and runs out into two forks, one jutting into the Sicilian, the other into the Cretan, sea. 1 Two thousand heavy infantry of the MUesians.'j This shows how numerous, at times, must nave been the quotas furnished by the allies j for two thousand (and that might not be the whole) might seem a greater force than would be demanded of one city. 4 The city, Src This expression has reference to the only other city which Cythera had, and that is said to have been inland, of the same name with the island. Nearly the same sites are now thought to be occupied, the latter by Paloeo Castro, the former by St. Nicolo. From Pausanias and Pliny, indeed, it would appear that the two cities were only ten stadia apart, and perhaps were regarded as one; Cythera being called tbe upper, and Scan ilea the lower, city. And so D'Anville and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 256 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 14mm | 463g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236615808
  • 9781236615800