The History of Slavery and the Slave Trade, Ancient and Modern; The Forms of Slavery That Prevailed in Ancient Nations, Particularly in Greece and Rome. the African Slave Trade and the Political History of Slavery in the United Volume 3

The History of Slavery and the Slave Trade, Ancient and Modern; The Forms of Slavery That Prevailed in Ancient Nations, Particularly in Greece and Rome. the African Slave Trade and the Political History of Slavery in the United Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1858 edition. Excerpt: ...of congress must also have the approbation of the man whom the people, in the remotest regions of the country, regard as their father.-After all, should there be any doubt of the constitutionality of the m_eaures of congress, they cannot be carried into etfect without the approval of the supreme court of the United States, composed of six of our most venerable sages, forming one of the most respectable courts upon earth, possessing our confidence as well from the independence of their position as from the long experience we have had of their wisdom. On this, as on all other occasions, he should see the effects of majority and of public passion on this subject totally unconcerned. The uproar of contending wares was not pleasant, but they were dashing against a rock." This speech of Baldwin's was on a motion of Benson's, which Baldwin had seconded, to recommit the-report, with a view to give the whole matter the goby. But the majority were not thus to be driven from their purpose. The motion to recommit was voted down, and the report was then taken up article by article. The three first resolutions (those relating to the power of congress over slavery in the states) were adopted, the second and third being compressed into one, dropping the somewhat offensive details, but retaining the substance. Upon the fourth resolution-that relating to the ten dollar tax on slaves imported-the struggle was renewed. Tucker moved to strike it out, in which he was supported by Baldwin, apparently on the ground that the resolution did not fairly express the sense of the constitution. Hartley took this occasion to defend the committee against some strictures of Burke's; but Burke still insisted that every clause in the report was drawn in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 444 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 23mm | 789g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123677034X
  • 9781236770349