History of the Siege of Boston, and of the Battles of Lexington, Concord, and Bunker Hill. Also an Account of the Bunker Hill Monument. with Illustrative Documents

History of the Siege of Boston, and of the Battles of Lexington, Concord, and Bunker Hill. Also an Account of the Bunker Hill Monument. with Illustrative Documents

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1872 edition. Excerpt: ...to the General Court and to Congress for indemnification for their loss, but without effect. The destruction naturally excited great indignation in the colonies. John Langdon, in a letter dated Philadelphia, July 3, 1775, writes: "The low, mean revenge and wanton cruelty of the ministerial sons of tyranny, in burning the pleasant town of Charlestown, beggars all description; this does not look like the fight of those who have so long been friends, and would hope to be friends again, but rather of a most cruel enemy, --though we shall not wonder when we reflect, that it is the infernal hand of tyranny which always has, and ever will, deluge that part of the world (which it lays hold of) in blood." 1 This estimate was made by a large committee, chosen by the town fen this purpose in March, 1776. The British Annual Register of 1775 said: "The fate of Charlestown was also a matter of melancholy contemplation to the serious and unprejudiced of all parties. It was the first settlement made in the colony, and was considered as the mother of Boston, --that town owing its birth and nurture to emigrants of the former. Charlestown was large, handsome, and well built, both in respect to its public and private edifices; it contained about four hundred houses, and had the greatest trade of any port in the province, except Boston. It is said that the two ports cleared out a thousand vessels annually for a foreign trade, exclusive of an infinite number of coasters. It is now buried in ruins. Such is the termination of human labor, industry, and wisdom, and such are the fatal fruits of civil dissensions." I thus have attempted to present the chief incidents of this memorable battle. It is its connection with the cause of American liberty...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 164 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 304g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236867467
  • 9781236867469