The History of Sicily from the Earliest Times; From the Tyranny of Dionysis to the Death of Agathokles Ed. from Posthumous Mss. with Supplements and N

The History of Sicily from the Earliest Times; From the Tyranny of Dionysis to the Death of Agathokles Ed. from Posthumous Mss. with Supplements and N

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1894 edition. Excerpt: ...Ionic settlement that we have now come, at Tauro-an event which fixed the character of Tauromenion as a menion. Greek city for three hundred years. Our account is provokingly meagre. We hear of Tauromenion without any hint as to its condition or constitution, except that Andro-it still stood open to receive fresh settlers. We hear of a citizen of Tauromenion, Andromachos by name, who is described as holding the chief position in the city by virtue of combined wealth and character. It is no doubt his own son who gives this report of him; for Andromachos was the father of the historian Timaios. Was he a popular 1 See above, p. 175. See above, loc. cit. This results from the coins which bear the legend TATPOMENITAN and APXArETAZ, and from the language of the great Tauromenitan inscriptions. C. I. G. 5640, 5641. ' Diod. xvi. 7; 'AvSpdpaxot i Tavpo/tfyirrp, Tifialov plv Toc Tcis laropias avyypwfavTos rarijp in, vovrfi Si xal -xi5 ka/iirp6TqTt dtapipan. RE-FOUNDATION OF TAUEOMENION BY ANDEOMACHOS. 287 leader, a magistrate of the commonwealth, or something Chap. xi. more? Whether demagogue, magistrate, or tyrant, he had power or influence for a great work. And, as it was a work in direct opposition to the policy of the late tyrant of Syracuse, we may safely believe that Tauromenion had taken advantage of the death of Dionysios to assert its independence. One class of his victims, or rather their Andro children, found at last a resting-place at the hands of piant3 Andromachos. The remnant of the scattered Naxians, Naxaan ' exiles at driven from Naxos, driven again from Mylai1, after wan-Taurodering for years up and down Sicily, were at last brought together by the Tauromenitan leader, and were received to the citizenship of the city on the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 206 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 376g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123667359X
  • 9781236673596