History of Rome, and of the Roman People; From Its Origin to the Invasion of the Barbarians and Fall of the Empire Volume 6, PT. 1

History of Rome, and of the Roman People; From Its Origin to the Invasion of the Barbarians and Fall of the Empire Volume 6, PT. 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1886 edition. Excerpt: ...of liberty and of order that was lacking to Greece, it was in men that the country was deficient. In a passage of the Histories of Polybius which we may well consider, this wise statesman seeks the causes of the ruin of Greece. He does not accuse, as a vulgar mind would do, fortune and the gods, but the people. He says: "We have had neither an epidemic nor war of long duration, and yet our cities are depopulated. We do not charge it to the gods, and we will not consult the oracles; the remedy, like the evil, is in ourselves. In our cities, from debauchery and sloth, marriage is avoided; and if children are born of transient unions, only one or two of them are kept, in order to leave them as rich as their parents. But let sickness strike down one of these children and war the other, and the house is left childless. Thus have our cities perished." 1 And unhappily we may say as he does: "Thus is our country depopulated." A singular similarity between two so difierent civilizations, in which the same anxiety for comfort has produced the same effects! The evil pointed out three centuries before by Polybius had only gone on increasing. That which was then true of Greece becomes true now of Italy. We see the rewards promised by Augustus to the heads of numerous families, but in vain: all failed against the selfishness of these nobles who now lived only for pleasure. Shameful vices, the plague-spot of the East in all ages," and the credit which, even with important personages, a fortune without heir secured, increased daily the number of men who avoided the duties of paternity. Among those even whom the law condemned, some avoided its stroke and usurped the privileges reserved for useful citizens. The unmarried were...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 114 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 218g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236844351
  • 9781236844354