History of Rome, and of the Roman People; From Its Origin to the Invasion of the Barbarians and Fall of the Empire Volume 5, PT. 1

History of Rome, and of the Roman People; From Its Origin to the Invasion of the Barbarians and Fall of the Empire Volume 5, PT. 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1886 edition. Excerpt: ...patricios adscivit. Capitolinus, Ant. Pius, 1, and Anton. Philos. 1. 2 Tac., Hist. i. 1. Epistt. v. 15. Cornutus had been allectus inter praetorios by Vespasian during his censorship (Orelli, No. 3,659). Ve may cite also C. Fulvius Servilianus, who had exercised the highest magistracy at Nemausus (Herzog, p. 123); Q. Aur. Pactumius Clemens, of Cirta, the first African honored with the consulship (L. Renier, I nscr. de l'A l-q., Nos. 1,807 and 1,808); C. Salv. Liberalis N onius Bassus, who was four times quinquennalis and the patron of Pollentia, but who resided at Rome, where he became known as an advocate (Borghesi, 178); the Spaniard Herennius Senecio, etc.. 4 Silv. iii. 3, 143: ... In cuneos populum quum duxil equestres. it had been trained to public affairs, where it had formed a taste for economy, simplicity, and order, brought into Rome the pure morals unknown to the descendants of the Republican proconsuls, that "gilded youth" whose scandalous libertinism we have seen under Nero. From this aristocracy were to come the great emper-ors of the second century, the able lieutenants who seconded them, and senators, hereafter conspiring only at long intervals, because, at last forgetting Brutus and Cato, whose statues no longer stand in the halls of these new houses, they will rarely yield to the temptations which famous names, the influ-ence of wealth, and the fatality of great memories ofiered to their predecessors. To the Senate, thus renewed, and be-come the true representative body of the 1 Empire, Vespasian submitted all important matters. He was present regularly at the discussions; and when he addressed a mes-sage to the Fathers, it was one of his sons, and not his quaestor, who went to read it. By his generosity...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 102 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 195g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236767233
  • 9781236767233