The History of the Roman Empire; From the Time of Jul. Caesar to That of Vitellius, from the Time of Vespasian to the Extinction of the Western Empire

The History of the Roman Empire; From the Time of Jul. Caesar to That of Vitellius, from the Time of Vespasian to the Extinction of the Western Empire

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1853 edition. Excerpt: ...of name, and Octavius with all his atrocities is forgotten, while we think only of Augustus, the peaceful sovereign of the civilized world, the patron of literature, and tie idol of the favourite writers of our youth. Appian, lib. iv. c. 2. Plutarch, in Antonio, c. 19. Such a spot as that described in the text, was the Isle of Athelney, in Somersetshire, to which Alfred is said to B.c. 43. fenny district between the Apennines and the Po, by the numerous Meeting streams which descended from the mountains, and which, for want AntoSus of a proper drainage, spread themselves to a vast extent over the AupKtus.nd low country, encircling various tracts of marshy ground in their irregular courses. On one of these spots, which the subsequent alterations in the nature of the country would soon make it almost impossible to identify, amidst a scenery, the dull and loathsome character of which well befitted the actors and the acts which they meditated, Antonius, Lepidus, and Augustus held their conference. It was pretended afterwards by the writers who flourished under the imperial government,1 that Augustus for a long time remonstrated against the bloody executions which Antonius and Lepidus were eager to perpetrate; but his language at a private meeting could not be so well ascertained as his subsequent conduct; and this, it is confessed, was more remorseless than that of either of his associates; for whilst Antonius and Lepidus listened in several instances to the influence of entreaties or of favour, and spared those whom they had condemned to death, it is mentioned that Augustus did not pardon a single victim.2 But whatever discussions may have taken place between the three leaders, the result sufficiently proved that all prinB c 42 ciples and all...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 316 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 17mm | 567g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236646959
  • 9781236646958