History of the Rise of the Mahomedan Power in India, Till the Year A.D. 1612; To Which Is Added an Account of the Conquest, by the Kings of Hydrabad, of Those Parts of the Madras Provinces Denominated the Ceded Districts and Volume 4

History of the Rise of the Mahomedan Power in India, Till the Year A.D. 1612; To Which Is Added an Account of the Conquest, by the Kings of Hydrabad, of Those Parts of the Madras Provinces Denominated the Ceded Districts and Volume 4

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1829 edition. Excerpt: ... early part of his reign has been recorded, should now give his confidence to one possessed of such power and influence among his relations and cast, and who had evinced an early devotion to the King's cause and to his person. the near approach of the rainy season as an excuse for non-attendance at court. The King took no measures against Bolijut Khan, but deputed Munsoor Khan, a nobleman of rank, to reduce Sikundur Khan of Bhilsa, and bring him to court. On hearing of this, Sikundur Khan abandoned Bhilsa, and proceeding to the south, occupied the country lying between Kuhndwa and Shahabad, where the rays of Gondwana had brought a large force to assist him. Under these circumstances, Munsoor Khan wrote to court that the troops with him were insufficient to oppose the united arms of the rays of Gondwana and Sikundur Khan. Medny Ray, wishing to see the whole of the old officers disgraced, in order to secure to himself all the court influence, answered the letter in the King's name, telling Munsoor Khan that the appearance of the royal troops alone would be sufficient to deter the enemy from attack, and that his application for a reinforcement was merely a subterfuge to avoid fighting. Munsoor Khan, astonished at the tenour and style of this letter, marched instantly with Bukhtiar Khan, and joined Bohjut Khan at Chundery. The King, hearing of the assemblage of troops at that place, took the field in person, and proceeded to D'har, having previously sent Medny Ray with his own adherents and one hundred and fifty elephants against Sikundur Khan. Medny Ray soon induced the forces of Sikundur Khan to disperse; and having made terms Probably Shahpoor. with the latter chief, both returned with Medny Ray to Bhilsa, which was again restored to...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 146 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 272g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236891821
  • 9781236891822