The History of the Revival and Progress of Independency in England; Since the Period of the Reformation with an Introduction, Containing an Account of the Development of the Principles of Independency in the Age of Christ and Volume 1

The History of the Revival and Progress of Independency in England; Since the Period of the Reformation with an Introduction, Containing an Account of the Development of the Principles of Independency in the Age of Christ and Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1847 edition. Excerpt: ... "The first example which we take is the passage from the epistle to Polycarp, which has been already given and of which the Syriac version is as follows: Look to the bishop, that God may also look upon you. I will be instead of the souls of those who are subject to the bishops and the presbyters and deacons; With them may I have a portion with God.'--The Syriac Version, pp. 8, 9. "Independently of all other considerations, which Will at once occur to our readers, we may just mention two facts, which render it very probable that this passage is an interpolation; first, it is the only place in which all the three orders of the clergy are mentioned; and secondly, it occurs in the midst of a personal address to a single individual, Polycarp, and it is, therefore, most strange for the writer all at once to break off the address to the person to whom he is writing, and to exclaim, 'Look to the bishop, that God also may look to you.'. "In the epistle to the Ephesians, the writer makes a slip which indubitably betrays the interpolator: --'I rejoice in you, and I offer supplication on account of you, Ephesians, a chwch which is renowned in all ages!'--p.'13.-. "Surely, Ignatius, who was put to death, at the latest calculation, in A.d. 116, could not have spoken in this way of a church which had not existed more than sixty or seventy years; but one can easily understand.Why a later writer should have bestowed such praise upon a church, the bishop of which was the metropolitan of all the churches in the province of Asia, and enjoyed the rights and privileges of a patriarch; naturally, therefore, would a later writer speak of thel church of Ephesus as one renowned in all ages. It is by incidental remarks of this kind that we are almost...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 84 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 168g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236625374
  • 9781236625373