History and Repository of Pulpit Eloquence, (Deceased Divines, ) Containing the Masterpieces of Bossuet, Bourdaloue Etc., Etc., with Discourses from Chrysostom, Basil and Others Among the "Fathers," and from Wickliffe, Luther Volume 2

History and Repository of Pulpit Eloquence, (Deceased Divines, ) Containing the Masterpieces of Bossuet, Bourdaloue Etc., Etc., with Discourses from Chrysostom, Basil and Others Among the "Fathers," and from Wickliffe, Luther Volume 2

By (author) 

List price: US$57.45

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1856 edition. Excerpt: ...of some few preachers of acknowledged attainments in pulpit oratory, both in the Protestant and Roman Catholic connections. The general character of the French school of preaching resembles that of the German, and is quite unlike that of the English. The English preachers disdain the arts of oratory, the French revel in animated diction, and graceful gesture. The former are solid, the latter ornamental. The former delve in theological lore, and feed the understanding; the latter elaborate eloquent paragraphs, to rouse up the sensibilities, and kindle into a blaze the feelings. The former have more of light, the latter more of heat. Both have their faults. If the former are instructive, they are also too dull and heavy. If the latter are animating and soul-stirring, they are sometimes too showy and bombastic. If the former arc wise in having an eye to the intellect, and the substance, they are unwise in losing sight of the heart and the manner. If the latter delight the imagination, and play skillfully upon the strings of the passions, it were wisdom, also, to unfold great principles, and lay a broad and deep foundation for a substantial and vigorous Christian life. Hence both the English and the French schools of pulpit eloquence should be studied. Some of the dryness of even the American pulpit could well be dispensed with, for more of the onction of the French. It is equally unwise either to copy, or to ignore, the one or the other. Let the excellences of both be sought after. Perhaps the present tendency is to forget that men have sentiments and feelings; that there are secret springs in the soul which an enchanting oratory may wisely take advantage ot in impressing Scripture truth. Should n sermon bear the marks of toe file and the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 512 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 26mm | 903g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236636910
  • 9781236636911