A History of the Relations Between the Two Houses of Parliament in Tasmania and South Australia; In Regard to Amendments to Bills Containing Provisions Relating to the Public Revenue or Expenditure

A History of the Relations Between the Two Houses of Parliament in Tasmania and South Australia; In Regard to Amendments to Bills Containing Provisions Relating to the Public Revenue or Expenditure

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1890 edition. Excerpt: ...any vote which might, in its opinion, press too heavily upon the people. "IX. That the exclusive power of originating money Bills and finally dealing with them, vested in the House of Assembly, gives to that House the control of the public purse; inasmuch as it alone has a right to decree what taxes shall be imposed, and how they shall be appropriated; and to represent that this Council is desirous of wresting the control of the purse from the House of Assembly is calculated to mislead the public as to the real merits of the question at issue between the two Houses. "X. That the maintenance of the views now expressed need not be detrimental to the harmonious working of the two Houses: that the consideration of all money questions by each House would tend to a more safe and economical administration of the public finances than could be secured by the consideration of such questions by one branch of the Legislature only; and that the denial on the part of the House of Assembly of the right of this Council to deal with matters of finance is inconsistent with the Constitution Act, and much to be regretted. "XI. That the exercise of concurrent powers of legislation by the two Houses (always excepting the originating of money Bills by the Legislative Council), would not interfere with the proper despatch of public business; and that the advantages that would result to the country from the revision of money Bills by this Council would more than compensate for any delay which might arise from such revision. "XII. That any difference which might arise between the two Houses with reference to matters of legislation resulting from the exercise of such concurrent powers should be adjusted by a conference. "XIII. That this...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 68 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 141g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236969383
  • 9781236969385