The History of the Reign of George III. to the Termination of the Late War; To Which Is Prefixed, a View of the Progressive Improvement of England, in Prosperity and Strength, to the Accession of His Majesty Volume 5

The History of the Reign of George III. to the Termination of the Late War; To Which Is Prefixed, a View of the Progressive Improvement of England, in Prosperity and Strength, to the Accession of His Majesty Volume 5

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1803 edition. Excerpt: ...and character of the i French revolutionists. Great and important as the progreffions of public opinions were in 1791, to arrest the attention of the philosophical observer, the actual events in England to employ the pen of the annalist, were not numerous. His highness the Duke of York, in the close of the year 1791, married the eldest Princess of Pruffia, between whom and the English prince a mutual affection had subsisted ever since the royal youth-'s refidence at the court of Berlin. The arrival of the fair stranger, the many festivities that ensued on so auspicious anioccasion, and the appearance of the new married couple in public, agreeably relieved the political discuffions which had long absorbed the attention of the public. but dwelt chiefly on the rapidly increasing prosperity of the British nation, whichmust confirm steady and zealous attachment to a constitution that we have found, from long experience, to unite the inestimable bleflings of liberty and order; and to which, under the favour of Providence, all our advantages are principally to be ascribed. Members of opposition arraigncd the conduct of ministers concerning Ruffia. Both the accusation and defence necessarily repeated former arguments. The British government thought interference necessary for the balance of power; and though they had sacrificed their own counsels to the voice of the public, the armarnent See Parliamentary Debates January zrst, r 792. _ scnbc the principle was fimple. Fox esteemed the outrages incidental effects of an enthufiafm which must be temporary, 'and which formed no part of the eflsiential character of the revolution: Burke reckoned the excesses necessary and essential parts of the revolution, which legitimately descended from its nature and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 92 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 181g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236799658
  • 9781236799654