The History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in England; Begun in the Year 1641 with the Precedent Passages and Actions, That Contributed Thereunto, and the Happy End, and Conclusion Thereof by the King's Blessed Restoration, Volume . 1

The History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in England; Begun in the Year 1641 with the Precedent Passages and Actions, That Contributed Thereunto, and the Happy End, and Conclusion Thereof by the King's Blessed Restoration, Volume . 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1721 edition. Excerpt: ...(who sate by amongst the other Members whilst the House was in a Committee, and had rarely us'd to speak in such seasons) rose up, and in a most pathetical Speech, in which he excell'd, endeavour'd to perswade the House "To comply with the King's desire, for the good of "the Nation, and to reconcile him to Parliaments for ever, "which this seasonable testimony of their affections would u infallibly do. He made it manifest to them how very inconsiderable a Sum twelve Subsidies amounted to, by telling them, "That he had computed what he was to pay for those "twelve Subsidies; and when he nam'd the Sum, he being known to be possefs'd of a great Estate, it seem'd not worth any sarther Deliberation. And in the warmth of his Discourse, which he plainly discern'd made a wonderful impression upon the House, he let sall some sharp expressions against the Imposition of Ship.money, and the Judgment in the point, which.be said plainly "Was against the Law, if "he understood what Law was (who was known to be very Learn'd) which expression, how necessary and artificial soever to reconcile the affections of the House to the matter in question, very much irreconcil'd him at Court, and to those upon whom he had the greatest dependence. There was scarce ever a Speech that more gather'd up and united the Inclinations of a popular Council to the.;' l.' Speaker; Speaker; and if the Question had been presently put, it was believ'd the number of the Dissenters would not have appear'd great. But after a short silence, some men, who wish'd well to the Main, express'd a dislike of the Way, so that other men recover'd new Courage, and call'd again with some earnestness, " That the Question formerly propos'd by...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 134 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 254g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236520025
  • 9781236520029