The History of the Public Revenue of the British Empire; Containing an Account of the Public Income and Expenditure from the Remotest Periods Recorded in History, to Michaelmas 1802 ... Volume 2

The History of the Public Revenue of the British Empire; Containing an Account of the Public Income and Expenditure from the Remotest Periods Recorded in History, to Michaelmas 1802 ... Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1803 edition. Excerpt: ...What I mean is, that every man should pay instead of o per ant. on his income, I per rent, on his capital, and 5 per cent, on his income, by which persons who had no capital, would be greatly relieved, relieved, and those who wtre possessed of considerable property, would piy more in proportion to their opulence, than under the system thatij proposed." Almost the only objection to this plan is, the difficulty of ascertaining the value of a man's capital. But is it oot the fame in regard to his income, unless it arises from some ixed and regular stiptn 1, and is liable to no uncertainty of deduction? Let us consider this important part of the subject, in the three great lines, os a landed ir.com:, of a commercial income, and of a prosefficnal income." " A landed income may be supposed the most certain and permanent, and in some particular instances it may be so; but, in general, a person os landed property, after deducting every public tax or imposition to which he is liable, is subject to a variety of burdens. In the first place, he is frequently under the necessity of being at very heavy legal expences for preserviag his property, and he is clearly entitled to deduct those expences. as it is profesed that the public shall avail itself of that part os hi; income, by taxing the gentlemen of the law. In the IccotJ place, he is under the necessity of spending money in the improvement of his estates, as in draining, fencing, building, tec. And in the third place, any person of landed property is subject to a variety os deductions in consequence of the rank heholdi in the state: be is obliged to act as sheriff, as justice of the pe.ee, and other public situation., without any recompence cr emolument whatsoever; and if any plan...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 108 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 209g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236567234
  • 9781236567239