The History of the Politicks of Great Britain and France, Vindicated from a Late Attack of Mr. William Belsham [In Remarks on a Late Publication Styled, the History of the Politics of Great Britain and France]

The History of the Politicks of Great Britain and France, Vindicated from a Late Attack of Mr. William Belsham [In Remarks on a Late Publication Styled, the History of the Politics of Great Britain and France]

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1801 edition. Excerpt: ...pease and onions. The whole of this new cpmmentary therefore, which consists of pure argument, shall be minutely examined, as soon as I have repelled the two attacks above mentioned; which indeed are not very formidable, as As Mr. B. has thought proper to fill five and twenty pages of his pamphlet with a re-impression of these Notes, he should certainly have given a coipplcte and correct copy of them. But I have collated What Mr. B. has given p. 35--39, as a copy of Mr. Chauvelin's Note of Dec. 27, 1192, and have found it very defective. Mr. Chauvelin, according to Mr. B. p. 35, ( begins by declaring," That the French Government, &c. But in reality Mr. Chauvelin gins with a paragraph, which Mr. Belshafn has wholly omitted. He has likewise omitted several passages in the body of the Note, without giving any indication of such omissions. And what he has given is not always in the precise words of the original. From such a garbled copy it is impossible to form an adequate idea of Mr. Chauvelin's Note. they they art; made only en passant, in two marginal notes, the one in page 0o the other1 in page 67. The first of them is made: on an inference Which I drew in ch. xiii. note 77, from the following assertion of Le Brun, the French minister for foreign affairs; that A rupture with England would be more contrary to the" inclination than to the interest of the republic--Having proved by unanswerable documents Quoted in the tenth chapter, that Le Brun and many other leading men in France, entertained the dehifive hopes, as Mr; Miles expresses it, that a declaration of war against England would be. immediately followed by an insurrection in this country I took for granted that Le Brun, When he used the word "interest" in the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 28 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236640179
  • 9781236640178