History of Pickens County, ALA; From Its First Development Is Eighteen Hundred and Seventeen to Eighteen Hundred and Fifty-Six

History of Pickens County, ALA; From Its First Development Is Eighteen Hundred and Seventeen to Eighteen Hundred and Fifty-Six

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1856 edition. Excerpt: ...by a respectable majority, although a Whig county. His labors that summer were of the most arduous nature. During the brief space of six weeks he was required to canvass for the Legislature, and also attend to a large practice in the Supreme and Chancery Courts. In the spring of 1846, Judge Clark was urged by his political friends to permit his name to be used in the Democratic Convention of the Fourth Congressional District, as a candidate for Congre-ss--a district where such a nomination was equivalent to an election. He did not consent, but was bullotted for against his consent, and frequently received a majority of the votes cast, two thirds being required to nominate. The county of Fayette, the residence of the present member, and the strongest Democratic county in that district, was not represented in the Convention. The leading Democrats of Fayette, for reasons not necessary to be here disclosed, would not send a delegation, unless Judge Clark would consent to become a candidate. Had Fayette been represented, he would have been nominated by the requisite two-thirds upon the first ballot, For some time previous to i846, Judge Clark had been seriously contemplating a removal and settlement upon the Mississippi river, that great commercial artery of the country. This design was hastened by the removal of the seat of government from Tuscaloosa, the city of his residence, to Montgomery, on the Alabama rivera removal which took with it the most important Courts, thus materially decreasing the business of the profession, and affecting the general importance and interests of the place. Deeming this to be a fit time for him to carry out his intention of establishing himself upon the "great father of waters," after atour of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 56 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 118g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123674165X
  • 9781236741653