The History of Party; From the Rise of the Whig and Tory Factions, in the Reign of Charles II, to the Passing of the Reform Bill Volume 2

The History of Party; From the Rise of the Whig and Tory Factions, in the Reign of Charles II, to the Passing of the Reform Bill Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1837 edition. Excerpt: ...hinting that it was the intention of his party, if this question should be again carried against them, to abandon the house to the minister, and to cease from all further efforts in parliament. The majority was against them; the report was received by a majority of thirty, and the threat was immediately fulfilled. Sir W. Wyndham, when the In this division, chance gave Rev. H. Etough.--Coxe's Walpole to the opposition two votes. The Correspondence. The question of noes remained in the house, the the convention was also marked by minister and his friends went forth thesecession of the Duke of Argyle, into the lobby. After the doors who, upon this occasion, abandoned were closed, the opposition tellers the ministers, and openly declared found a stray member asleep upon against them; a circumstance which the ministerial benches; he was induced the Duchess of Marlbo quickly aroused, and, in spite of his rough to prophesy the approaching remonstrances, numbered among dissolution of the ministry. "When the minority. Mr. Orlebar to the a house is to fall," says the duchess, numbers were declared, rose and said, "Sir, I have CHAP, xv. seen with the utmost concern this shameful--this----A.D.1738 fatal measure approved of; and I now rise up to pay to 1739. my last duty to my country as a member of this house. "I was in hopes, sir, that the many unanswerable arguments urged in the debate against the convention, might have prevailed upon gentlemen to have, for once, listened to the dictates of reason; for once, to have distinguished themselves from being a faction against the liberties and properties of their fellowsubjects. I was the more in hopes of this, sir, since, in all the companies I have been in from the time this...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 122 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 231g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236761243
  • 9781236761248