History of the Organization of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South; Comprehending All the Official Proceedings of the General Conference the Souther

History of the Organization of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South; Comprehending All the Official Proceedings of the General Conference the Souther

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1845 edition. Excerpt: ...vague and terrifying dread of it. The one tends to improper rashness and precipitancy, the other to a tame surrender of sacred rights, and a degrading unconditional submission. This fearful crisis has been brought upon us, not by ourselves, but by the unbridled ultraism of our Northern brethren; and it is for us to do the best we can in this emergency. Theirs is the onerous responsibility, before heaven and earth, of bringing us into most trying difficulties--ours the responsibility of conducting ourselves worthy our Christian profession and our cause, under those difficulties. "To us it does appear, that the delegates from the Southern and South-western Conferences could not have done less than they did, without sacrificing the best religious interests of the South, and most of all, those of the slave, the professed object of Northern sympathy. "After the majority of the General Conference, in the opinion of the Southern delegates, had violated not only the settled usage of the Church, but the unambiguous letter of the law, in the case of Mr. Harding--after they had refused to Bishop Andrew the protection of all Church law, and assumed and exercised the power of inflicting punishment without law, ---had the Southern delegates tamely submitted to all, what must have been the result? In the first place, doubtless multitudes of the Southern membership would have felt themselves compelled to secede from the Church immediately. "The next would inevitably have been, that Methodist preachers would have been promptly excluded from all access to the slave population of the South, and this great open door of usefulness would have been firmly closed. And beside, it would have invited to further aggressions on the part of the North. "Now...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 118 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 227g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236515145
  • 9781236515148