History of the New Netherlands, Province of New York, and State of New York, to the Adoption of the Federal Constitution; By William Dunlap

History of the New Netherlands, Province of New York, and State of New York, to the Adoption of the Federal Constitution; By William Dunlap

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1839 edition. Excerpt: ...a French priest harrangued the Indians, telling them that " Ononthio is their father, Corlaer only their brother;" the Jesuit missionaries love them, and France wishes peace for their welfare. Other French agents talk to them in the same strain, and endeavour to persuade the Indians that the power of France is to be dreaded; but the fatherly love of the nation is boundless. But an Englishman, says Charlevoix, accompanied by an Onondaga, arrived at the council, who tells them from Bellamont, not to listen to the French; that he in ten or twelve days expects to meet the Five Nations at Albany. This lordly tone, the Jesuit says, displeased the Iroquois; and the missionary increased their discontent, by telling them, that the English treated them as if they were subjects--that to avoid slavery they must be reconciled to their father. One of the French officers went to the Seneca nation to recover the prisoners. Liberty is given to the Frenchmen to return; but the greater number being adopted, and pleased with the savage life, Vol. i. 31 242 MAKES PEACE WITH THE IROQUOIS. refused to return to civilization. While this was passing among the Senecas, the Iroquois held a general council at Onondaga, at which an officer of Lord Bellamont's was present. The Indians avowed their determination to visit Canada and conclude a peace with France. The Jesuits were displeased, however, by the admission which the Mohawks had given to Dellius, who before his degradation by the New York Assembly, acted among the Iroquois as a protestant minister. But this man appears to have been more intent upon securing property to himself as a commissioner for Indian affairs, than on making converts. The Jesuit says, a female Iroquois resided with the Dutch...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 224 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 408g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236858174
  • 9781236858177