History of the Navy of the United States of America; Continued to 1860 from the Author's Manuscripts and Other Authentic Sources Volume 1-3

History of the Navy of the United States of America; Continued to 1860 from the Author's Manuscripts and Other Authentic Sources Volume 1-3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1864 edition. Excerpt: ... she whipt up one of the gun-deck guns to the spar-deck, and run it out alt, as a stern chaser, getting a long eighteen off the forecastle also for a similar purpose. Two more of the twenty-fours below were run out at the cabin windows, with the same object. It was found necessary to cut away some of the taffrail, in order to make room. By 6 o'clock the wind, which continued very light and bafiiing, came out from the northward of west, when the ship's head was got round to the southward, and all the light canvass that would draw was set. Soon after, the nearest frigate, the Shannon, opened with her how guns, and continued firing for about ten minutes, but perceiving she could not reach the Constitution, she ceased. At half past 6, Captain Hull sounded in 26 fathoms, when finding that the enemy was likely to close, as he was enabled to put the boats of two ships on one, and was also favoured by a little more air than the Constitution, all the spare rope that could be found, and which was fit for the purpose, was payed down into the cutters, bent on, and a kedge was run out near a mile ahead, and let go. At a signal given, the crew clapped on, and walked away with the ship, overrunning and tripping the kedge as she came up with the end of the line. When this was done, another kedge was carried ahead, and, though out of sight of land the frigate glided away from her pursuers, before they discovered the manner in which it was done. At half past 7, the Constitution had a little air, when she set her ensign, and fired a shot at the Shannon, the nearest ship astern. At 8, it fell calm again, and further recourse was had to the boats and the kedges, the enemy's vessels having a light air, and drawing ahead, towing and sweeping....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 336 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 18mm | 599g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236794885
  • 9781236794888