The History of Modern Europe, Part II; From the Peace of Westphalia, in 1648, to the Peace of Paris, in 1763 with a View of the Progress of Society Duing the Present Century, in a Series of Letters from a Nobleman to His Son Volume 2

The History of Modern Europe, Part II; From the Peace of Westphalia, in 1648, to the Peace of Paris, in 1763 with a View of the Progress of Society Duing the Present Century, in a Series of Letters from a Nobleman to His Son Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1784 edition. Excerpt: ...able efltefitually to cut ofir' all supplies. After a fiege of forty-nine days, during which every possible effort had been made, the governor, threatened with a general afsault, being doubtful of the fidelity of his garrison, and seeing no prospeft of relief, agreed to surrender the town; and the whole ifl-and of Cape Breton, or, as the French pompoufiy called it, Isle Royale, immediately submitted to the viftors.. THIS conquest, the importance of which-was much magnified, pcontributed greatly to confirm the zeal of the friends' of the protestant succession in Scotland; and if vigorous measures had been taken by government, the rebellion might have been crushed in its birth. But George II. being then at Hanover, the regency appointed, during his absence, (lighted every' information relative to the enterprise of the young ' Pre 1 Pretender, till all North Britain was threatened with lsubjeftion. They could not believe he would have the hardiness to land without a, powerful foreign force; so that Charles's very Weakness, under the veil of his temerity, may be said to have advanced his progress. Descending from the mountains with the qrapidity of a torrent, he took possession of Dunkeld, Perth, and Dundee; every where proclaiming his father, the chevalier de St. George, king of Great Britain, and seizing the public money for his use. At Perth he reviewed his forces, and found them amount to upwards of three thousand men. Here he was joined by the viscount Strathallan, lord Nairn, lord George Murray, brother to the duke of Athol, Drummond, the ticular duke of Perth 3, and several other pe-rsons of distinfition. And the marquis of Tullibardine having taken posI'esT1on of the estate of Athol, which his younger brother inherited, as well as the title, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 122 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 231g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236636775
  • 9781236636775