The History of Long Island, from Its Discovery to the Present Time; With Many Important and Interesting Matters, Including Notices of Numerous Individuals and Families, Also a Particular Account of the Different Churches and Volume 1

The History of Long Island, from Its Discovery to the Present Time; With Many Important and Interesting Matters, Including Notices of Numerous Individuals and Families, Also a Particular Account of the Different Churches and Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1843 edition. Excerpt: ... court of sessions in the north riding, was afterwards held at Jamaica, and finally established there by the assembly in 1683. For this purpose a building was erected there in 1684, called the County Hall, which in 1686, was demised to one Richard Cornwell for the term of twenty-one years, on his undertaking to keep the same in repair, and allow the courts of sessions and assize to be held in it. In 1690, this edifice was repaired and somewhat enlarged, but was soon found too small to answer the necessities of the county. After the completion of the new presbyterian church in 1700, the courts were held therein for several years. But in 1708, an act was passed for rebuilding the county hall, which was finished the year following, and stood upon or near the site of the late female academy in the village of Jamaica, now occupied by Her riman's buildings. This edifice continued to be used for all county purposes, till the erection of the present court house, upon Hempstead Plain, in 1786; and in which the first court was held Nov. 13th of that year. This site was, it seems, determined upon, as being the territorial centre of the county, and nearly dividing the population in all directions; a matter which was thought by the founders, of sufficient consequence to outweigh all the disadvantages which might reasonably have been anticipated from, a location so extremely improper. The written records of the county are coeval with the period of its organization, and have been well preserved to the present time." The first entry is that of a release from James Feeke to Mary Feeke, widow of Tobias Feeke of Flushing, dated Feb. 1, 1683, at which period William Nicoll, Esq., was clerk of the county, and John Bowne, treasurer, whose dwelling, erected in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 198 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 363g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236489780
  • 9781236489784