The History of Literature; Or, the Progress of Language, Writing and Letters, from the Earliest Ages of Antiquity to the Present Time with a View of the State of Science and the Fine Arts in Four Volumes Volume N . 3

The History of Literature; Or, the Progress of Language, Writing and Letters, from the Earliest Ages of Antiquity to the Present Time with a View of the State of Science and the Fine Arts in Four Volumes Volume N . 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1846 edition. Excerpt: ...author gave him of its design and plan, ordered it to be translated into Latin; and on reading its translation, he expressed great surprise that the Mahometans should be so much better acquainted with the subject than the Christians, and invited our author to remain in his court; but the philosopher refused, and withdrew into Mauritania. Roger still continuing to admire the book, was asked, why he did not prefer the geography of Ptolemy, which was that of a much more learned writer? he replied, "Ptolemy has only described a part of the world, Essachalli the whole." This philosopher died at Cividad, in Africa, A. D. 1121. Among the Spanish Saracens, Avenzoar and Thophail are celebrated names. The former, a native of Seville, by rejection of many useless theories, was deemed the rational improver of medicine among the Arabians. He died in the 1168th year of the Christian sera. About the same time flourished Thophail, also born at Seville, and, with Avenzoar, the preceptor of the great Averroes. He died about the close of the twelfth centuty, leaving behind him the character of an elegant author and a good philosopher. Of all the Arabian scholars and physicians, however, the most celebrated is Averroes, one whom Christians as well as Arabians esteemed to be equal, if not superior, to Aristotle himself. Averroes was born about the middle of the twelfth century, of a noble family, at Cordova, the capital of the Saracen dominions in Spain. He was early instructed in the Islamitic law, and, after the manner of the Arabian schools, previously introduced, united with the study of the Mahometan theology that of the Aristotelian philosophy. In these studies he was directed by Thophail, and, under Avenzoar, he cultivated the science of medicine, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 158 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 295g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236553187
  • 9781236553188