History of Lincoln County, Missouri, from the Earliest Time to the Present; Including a Department Devoted to the Preservation of Sundry Personal, Business, Professional and Private Records...

History of Lincoln County, Missouri, from the Earliest Time to the Present; Including a Department Devoted to the Preservation of Sundry Personal, Business, Professional and Private Records...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1888 edition. Excerpt: ...seasons and with the best of cultivation, the average usually being less than half that amount. The soil throughout the county is rich in wheat producing principles, and with proper fertilization, subsoiling and underdrain ing, it can be made to yield from thirty to forty bushels per acre in most all seasons. The preparation of soils by underdrainage has as yet been scarcely thought of in Lincoln County. Corn and oats are produced in great abundance. It would be diflicult to find a soil better adapted to either of these cereals. The soil is also well adapted to the growing of the grasses, especially timothy, which is the best known grass for hay. Clover also succeeds well, but it is not extensively grown. Hungarian grass and millet grow well all over the county. Barley and buckwheat also yield well, but are not extensively sown. Broom corn yields abundantly in every part of the county, but, except in a few localities, no attention has been paid to it. Tobacco is advantageously grown on the timbered lands. The golden leaf of the white oak and post oak ridges is of the very finest quality, and is in great demand for wrappers. In the great tobacco fair of St. Louis, in 1869, Lincoln County tobacco took the first premium, nearly every State in the Union being represented. Sorghum is grown in every part of the county; the uplands producing less but of a finer quality. The small mills in the different localities manufacture the cane into molasses 'with success varying according to skill employed. The syrups from some of these mills will rival in color and flavor the finest silver drips. The consumption of sorghum, in this county, is fast superseding that of foreign syrups. As yet scarcely any has been exported, but its manufacture is...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 422g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 123687241X
  • 9781236872418