History of the Later Roman Commonwealth, from the End of the Second Punic War to the Death of Julius Caesar and of the Reign of Augustus Volume 2

History of the Later Roman Commonwealth, from the End of the Second Punic War to the Death of Julius Caesar and of the Reign of Augustus Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1845 edition. Excerpt: ...covered by their own position, while they were likely to keep a watchful eye upon the more difficult track by which they had themselves effected their passage. The space between their two camps was secured by fortifications connecting the two hills with each other; their fleet was stationed in the neighbouring harbour of Neapolis to co-operate with them; and their magazines of every kind were placed in perfect safety in the island of Thasos, which lay just opposite to that part of the coast at an inconsiderable distance from the main land. Thus situated, and having all the resources of Asia in their rear, while their enemy's communications with Italy and the 2M Appian, IV. 103,104. ANTONIUS AND AUGUSTUS AT BRUNDUSIUM. 237 western provinces would be, as they hoped, con-Chap. stantly intercepted by the fleets of Sex. Pompeius--' and L. Murcus, they trusted to follow successfully 709 the system which Pompey, under similar circum- .c.45 stances, had been unwisely induced to abandon, and to bring the war to a triumphant end, without exposing themselves to the hazard of a battle. But Antonius effected his passage from Brundu-Antontm-i and Augus sium with the same success which had attended him hfliTM in Macedo before in the very same place, and under the same nia t0, op pose them. circumstances, when he commanded the rear division of Caesar's army, and joined his general on the coast of Epirus in spite of all the fleets of Pompey. After he had been blockaded for some time by L. Murcus, he sent to Augustus, who was then at Rhegium, requesting him to suspend his preparations against Sicily, and to employ his naval force in driving off the blockading squadron from Brundusium 254. It does not appear, however, that the fleet which Augustus..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 128 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 240g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236751582
  • 9781236751584