History of Lafayette County, Wisconsin; Containing an Account of Its Settlement, Growth, Development and Resources, an Extensive and Minute Sketch of Its Cities, Towns and Villages ..., Its War Record, Biographical Sketches ...; The Whole

History of Lafayette County, Wisconsin; Containing an Account of Its Settlement, Growth, Development and Resources, an Extensive and Minute Sketch of Its Cities, Towns and Villages ..., Its War Record, Biographical Sketches ...; The Whole

List price: US$22.40

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1881 edition. Excerpt: ...A report from Charles Smith, dated July 25, 1826, says: "I have surveyed the upper street in the town, and staked off the lots fifty feet, forty-one in number. There is a great itch ing for privileges, and a superabundant measure of independence. Complaints about right ground, and this, that and the other right, are accumulating every day, both from diggers ant. settlers, and God knows what and when will be the end of all things. The dead and the living both conspire to cause me a great deal of trouble. I am no prophet, but I will be mad enough to predict that not many months will elapse without the necessity of the intervention of military force (the only force that can be recognized in this county) to protect the interest of the mines, and to encourage their development. Every day adds proof of their immense importance, and justifies the employment of every possible means for their protection and support. The competition among smelters may, I dare say will, have a tendency eventually to injure the mines by producing a reaction upon themselves, and exciting a rebellious spirit among the miners." Mr. Smith's allusion to the dead and living is explained by the fact that in earlier days the people buried their dead in various places along the bench where Bench street, Galena, is now. These remains had to be removed, of course, when the town was laid out, and caused the goodnatured Smith a deal of trouble. His gloomy predictions, happily, were not fulfilled. Thomas McKnight succeeded Charles Smith as resident sub-agent, and remained until Lieut. Thomas was succeeded by Capt. Legato in 1829. Charles Smith died at Galena March 3, 1829. Mr. McKnight arrived at Fever River as sub-agent November 15, 1826. His first report is dated...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 514 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 26mm | 907g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236830547
  • 9781236830548