History of Lafayette County, Wisconsin, Containing an Account of Its Settlement, Growth, Development and Resources; An Extensive and Minute Sketch of Its Cities, Towns and Villages Its War Record, Biographical Sketches the Whole

History of Lafayette County, Wisconsin, Containing an Account of Its Settlement, Growth, Development and Resources; An Extensive and Minute Sketch of Its Cities, Towns and Villages Its War Record, Biographical Sketches the Whole

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1881 edition. Excerpt: ...I. of Iowa, late Commissioner of the General Land Office at Washington. The following is the description of the log furnace one hundred and thirty-seven years ago: " They cut down two or three big trees and divide them in logs five feet long; then they dig a small basin in the ground and pile three or four of these logs on top of each other over this basin; then they cover it with the same wood, and put three more logs, shorter than the first, on top, and one at each end crosswise. This makes a kind of box, in which they put the mineral; then they pile as much wood as they can on top and around it. When this is done, they set fire to it from under, the logs burn up, and partly melt the mineral. They are sometimes obliged to repeat the same operation three times in order to extract all the matter. This matter, falling into the basin, forms a lump, which they afterward melt over again into bars, weighing from sixty to eighty pounds, in order to facilitate the transporlation to Kaskoskia. This is done with horses, who are quite vigorous in this country. One horse carries generally four or five of these bars. It is worthy of remark, gentlemen, that in spite of the bad system these men have to work, there have been taken out of the La Motte mine 2,500 of these bars in 1741; 2,228 in 1742; and these men work only four or five months in the year at most." Mr. Margry also observes that he is unable to throw direct light upon the occupation of the Fever River section by the French, in the eighteenth century. A history of Louisiana, written by Lepage Dupratz in 1758, forty-five years before the ownership of the colony was transferred, con"-tains the statement that " the region is not frequented." This is but natural, since the French Governors held...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 478 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 24mm | 844g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236661818
  • 9781236661814