History of Lafayette County, Mo; Carefully Written and Compiled from the Most Authentic Official and Private Sources, Including a History of Its Townships, Cities, Towns, and Villages

History of Lafayette County, Mo; Carefully Written and Compiled from the Most Authentic Official and Private Sources, Including a History of Its Townships, Cities, Towns, and Villages : Together with a Condensed History of Missouri, the

By (author) 

List price: US$22.40

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1881 edition. Excerpt: ...time in that part of the entrenchment nearest the hospital. But, aside from this, the oflicial report of Gen. Harris, made at the time, shows that there wasno such reason for the capture; but that it was deliberately planned and ordered as a rightful military movement. The federals had no military right to expect that a strategic position so important to their opponents as the Anderson house and premises manifestly was, would or s ould be left in their quiet possession merely because they had seen fit to use some part of it for hospital purposes. Nevertheless, that first false scent has been followed and barked after for twenty years--the federals erroneously claiming an unjustifiable attack on the hospital, and the confederates erroneously claiming that they were first fired on by federals from inside the building, and that for t/tat reason the attack was made. Here is what Pollard's southern history, page, 165, says about it: As a detachment of the Missouri troops, under command of Col. Rives, were passing down the bank of the river to capture a steamboat lying under the enemy's guns, a fire was opened upon him from a building known as Anderson's house, standing on the summit of the bluff, and designated as a hospital by the white flag over it. There were in the building at the time, twenty-four, sick;, but it contained also a large body of armed soldiers. Indi ant at the perfidy which directed this attack, several companies from en. Harris, and the fourth division, rushed up the bank, leaped over every barrier and speedily overpowered the garrison. Compare this with Gen. Harris' report, and see how widely they differ. Gen. Harris was the man who planned and ordered the movement, and he certainly ought to know...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 322 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 17mm | 576g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236867297
  • 9781236867292