History of Ireland; Ancient and Modern, Taken from the Most Authentic Records, Published at Paris in 1758, and Dedicated to the Irish Brigade Volume 3

History of Ireland; Ancient and Modern, Taken from the Most Authentic Records, Published at Paris in 1758, and Dedicated to the Irish Brigade Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1832 edition. Excerpt: ...to make peace; the latter plan prevailed, and a fresh reinforcement of troops was ordered to Ireland. In consequence of this, the Deputy wrote to Tyrone, in April, proposing terms of peace, in the name of the Queen and council, which, in regard to religion, and the reparation of injuries that the Irish Catholics had sustained, appeared reasonable. The Prince of Tyrone, however, knew too well the disposition of the English, to place any confidence in their promises; he knew, likewise, that nothing but the inabilty of acting otherwise, would influence them to keep faith with him; besides, he expected daily the assistance that had been promised to him by the King of Spain, so that he rejected the overtures of the Deputy. Mountjoy felt the necessity of removing the suspicions which had been entertained against him by the court; finding the Prince of Tyrone deaf to the proposals he had made, his only resource was to redeem his honour by force. He now collected his troops, to attack Tyrone by sea and land; in the month of March, a fleet of sixtyseven ships, under Sir Henry Dockwra, was ordered to take possession of a lake in the north of Ireland, called Pet. Lombard, ibid: p. 445. et seq. VOL. III. 2 L Loughfoyle, between the peninsula oflnisowen find Arachty Cahan, to cause, in that quarter, a diversion favourable to the expedition of his forces by land. Five thousand infantry and three hundred horse were on board this fleet, well provided with ammunition and warlike stores: the English commander constructed, on the borders of Loughfoyle, four forts, from whence he made frequent incursions on the lands of O'Dogharty, and other noblemen. O'Neill, when informed of the movements of the English, assembled a council of the chief men of the province, to...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 162 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 299g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236651634
  • 9781236651631