The History of Hindostan; Translated from the Persian to Which Are Prefixed Two Dissertations, the First Concerning the Hindoos, and the Second on the Origin and Nature of Despotism in India Volume 1

The History of Hindostan; Translated from the Persian to Which Are Prefixed Two Dissertations, the First Concerning the Hindoos, and the Second on the Origin and Nature of Despotism in India Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1812 edition. Excerpt: ...desperate by their former loss, made a dreadful slaughter among the troops, who could not be regularly brought up to the charge. The Ghiznians continued to fight and retreat for two days and nights, but Hussein, the son of Ali, could not be persuaded to quit the field, so that after the most of his men were killed, he himself fell a prisoner into the hands of the enemy. Buctadi fled, and carried advice of his own defeat to the King at Neshapoor. Musaood was obliged for that time to restrain his resentment, upon account of some disturbances in India. He marched back to Ghizni, in the year 42(5; and thence sent an army under Ban, an Indian chief, against Ahmud, who had rebelled in his government. But, when the two armies met, Ban was defeated with great slaughter. Musaood, being informed of this disaster, sent Touluck, another Indian chief, who, coming to battle with Ahmud, gave him a total overthrow. He fled in great haste towards Munsura, Tatta and the country near the mouth of the Indus. Touluck pursued him so close, that many thousands of the runaways fell into his hands, whom he treated in the most inhuman manner, cutting off their noses and ears. When Ahmud reached the banks of the Indus, he found himself, if possible, in greater distress than before; for collecting all the boats, which the pressure of the enemy would permit, he endeavoured to cross the river. But the soldiers, afraid of being abandoned, hurried into the boats with such violence, and in such numbers, that most of them were either overset or sunk. A sudden storm, and an inundation of the river, added to the confusion ot the vanquished; so that very few of them escaped. The body of their chief was soori after found by the enemy, and his head sent to Ghizni. A new palace being...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 152 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 286g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236650220
  • 9781236650221