The History of Herodotus. a New Engl. Version, Ed. with Notes by G. Rawlinson Assisted by Sir H. Rawlinson and Sir J.G. Wilkinson

The History of Herodotus. a New Engl. Version, Ed. with Notes by G. Rawlinson Assisted by Sir H. Rawlinson and Sir J.G. Wilkinson

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1875 edition. Excerpt: ...Ceos, hare made it more famous than many a larger place. given the number of ships furnished by each. The total number of the ships thus brought together, without counting the penteconters, was two hundred and seventy-one;8 and the captain, who had the chief command over the whole fleet, was Eurybiades, the son of Eurycleides. He was furnished by Sparta, since the allies had said that, "if a Lacedaemonian did not take the command, they would break up the fleet, for never would they serve under the Athenians." 3. From the first, even earlier than the time when the embassy went to Sicily4 to solicit alliance, there had been a talk of intrusting the Athenians with the command at sea; but the allies were averse to the plan, wherefore the Athenians did not press it; for there was nothing they had so much at heart as the salvation of Greece, and they knew that, if they quarrelled among themselves about the command, Greece would be brought to ruin.6 Herein they judged rightly; for internal strife is a thing as much worse than war carried on by a united people, as war itself is worse than peace. The Athenians therefore, being so persuaded, did not push their claims, but waived them, so long as they were in such great need of aid from the other Greeks. And they afterwards showed their motive; for at the time when the Persians had been driven from Greece, and were now threatened by the Greeks in their own country, they took occasion of the insolence of Pausanias to deprive the Lacedaemonians of their leadership. This, however, happened afterwards.6 3 This number agrees exactly with the statement of the several contingents--an unusual circumstance in oar present copies of Herodotus. It is confirmed by Diodorus, who makes the fleet consist of 280...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 222 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 404g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236640497
  • 9781236640499