The History of Gustavus Adolphus and of the Thirty Years' War; Up to the King's Death with Some Account of Its Conclusion by the Peace of Westphalia Anno 1648

The History of Gustavus Adolphus and of the Thirty Years' War; Up to the King's Death with Some Account of Its Conclusion by the Peace of Westphalia Anno 1648

By (author) 

List price: US$22.16

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1856 edition. Excerpt: ...time, I desire also for you." Golnau, Dec. 4. 1630, apud Mauvillon, ii. p. 437., and Geijer, iii. p. 196. note. Harte, who gives a portion of this letter, from Loccenius, supposes that it was written only a few days before the king's death. Loccenius himself says (p. 505.), "proximo ante mortem suam anno." CHAP. VIII. NEGOTIATIONS WITH BRANDENBURG.--TREATY "WITH FRANCE.--FURTHER CONQUESTS IN POMEHANIA AND MECKLENBURG.--CAPTURE OF FRANCFORT-UPON-THE-ODER.--DIET AT LEIPSIG.--SACK OF MAGDEBURG.--CAMP AT WERBEN.--TREATT WITH SAXONY.--BATTLE OF LEIPSIG. Chap. At the beginning of the year 1631, 'an envoy from. vm-, Gustavus Adolphus to the court of Berlin crossed on J631. the road the Chancellor Goetz, charged with a mission to the Swedish camp from the Elector of Brandenburg. The objects of this mission were to appease the king's anger for the late refusal of a passage through Kiistrin, to offer the passage now, clogged with certain conditions intended to secure the electorate from occupation and contribution; and to propose the elector's mediation for the purpose of re-establishing peace. Gustavus received the chancellor with his habitual courtesy, but thought that, until the Imperialists gave some credible token that they really desired peace, to discuss the subject would be premature and useless. The offered passage through Kiistrin he thankfully accepted, upon condition of using it simply and solely as a passage. To the other conditions, now that the chief advantage to have been derived from the privilege--the opportunity of destroying Schaumburg's army--Chemnitz, i. p. 93. had been lost, he could not subscribe, unless the elector Chap. ventered with him into a treaty binding himself to co-. VIL operate with him cordially in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 132 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 249g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236649567
  • 9781236649560