The History of Great Britain from the Death of George II; To the Coronation of George IV; Designed as a Continuation of Hume and Smollett Volume 1

The History of Great Britain from the Death of George II; To the Coronation of George IV; Designed as a Continuation of Hume and Smollett Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1832 edition. Excerpt: ...of kyr, and of my frendes, to recovtr it;' the which reunite vxu in.poynt to bfoudone by defaut of governance, and andoying of the gvde. fame (79). In order to understand this speech, it must-be observed, that there was silly story, received among some-of the lowest vulgar, that Edmond. earl qf Lancaster, son of Henry'III., was really the elder brotJier of Edward'I.; but that, by reason of some deformity in his perstei, he had been postponed in the succession, and his younger brother imposed on the nation'in his stead. As the present duke of Lancaster inherited from Edmond by his mother, this genealogy made him the true heir of the monarchy;.and it is therefore insinaated in Henry's speech.-.but the absurdity was too gross to be openly avowed either by him or by the parliament. The case is the same with regard to his right of conquest: he was a-eubject who rebelled against his sovereign; he entered the kingdom, with a retinue of no more than sixty person; he could not therefore be the conqueror of England; and this right is accordingly insinuated, ' not avowed. Still there is a third claim, derived, from his merit in saving the nation from tyranny and oppression; ami this claim is also insinuated: but as it seemed, by its nature, better calculated as a reason tor his being elected king by a free choice, than for giving Rim an immediate right of possession, he durst hot speak djH.'iily even en liiis lii-iul; and to ulivi; !.' any notion of election, .he challenges the crown as his due, either by acquisition-or; i: i-Ti' uu-. The whole forms such a piece of jargon and nonsense, as is almost without example; no objection, however, was made to it. in, parliament: the unanimous voice of lords and conjmons placed Henry on the throne: he...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 638 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 33mm | 1,120g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236758323
  • 9781236758323