History of Europe; From the Commencement of the French Revolution in MDCCLXXXIX [I.E. 1789] to the Restoration of the Bourbons in MDCCCXV [I.E. 1815] Volume 2

History of Europe; From the Commencement of the French Revolution in MDCCLXXXIX [I.E. 1789] to the Restoration of the Bourbons in MDCCCXV [I.E. 1815] Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1847 edition. Excerpt: ...midst of his capital. Changes which have hardly been brought about in England from the time of Alfred, were effected in France in less than five months. Experience might well have taught the promoters of the French Revolution, that such excessive precipitation 71 could lead to nothing but disastrous results. Nothing Their exdurable in nature is made except by the slowest degrees; ness'"TM81 the flowers of the summer are as ephemeral as the warmth which produces them; the oak. the growth of centuries, survives the maturity and the decay of empires. The dominion of Alexander, raised in a few campaigns, perished within the lifetime of those who witnessed its birth; the Roman empire, formed in a succession of ages, endured a thousand years. It is in vain to suppose that the habits of a nation can be changed, and its character altered, by merely giving it new institutions. We cannot confer on childhood the firmness of maturity by putting on it the dress of manhood. It is no apology for the Constituent Assembly to say, that they committed no violence themselves; that their measures were in great part adopted from the purest philanthropy; that they were themselves, the victims of the faction which disgraced the Revolution. In public men we expect not merely good intentions, but prudent conduct; it is no excuse for those who have done evil, to assert that they did so that good might come of it. If we pull down with too much haste, we do as much, mischief as if we retain with too much obstinacy. The virtuous should always recollect, that if they remove the half, the reckless will speedily destroy the whole. The danger of political changes arises not from their immediate, but their ultimate consequences; not so much from those who originate, as those...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 154 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 286g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236491661
  • 9781236491664