The History of English Poetry, from the Close of the Eleventh Century to the Commencement of the Eighteenth Century Volume 3

The History of English Poetry, from the Close of the Eleventh Century to the Commencement of the Eighteenth Century Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1840 edition. Excerpt: ...heare suche, and thinke muche learnyng is gotte when thei maie talke with them."" But he adds the faults which were 'Companions, a cant word. bothe the aire is better, the people more 'Fol. 74 a. ciuil, and the wealth much greater, and See fol. 70 a. the menne for the most parte more wise." "All England, he says, lament the fol. 7 a. death of Duke Henrie and Duke Charles, "Fol. 7 a. two noble brethren of the house of Suf-w He mentions the Lute again. "The folk. Then may we well judge that these tongue giueth a certaine grace to euery two gentlemen were wonderfully beloved matter, and beautineth the cause, in like when they both were so lamented." fol. maner as a sweete soundyng lute muche 65 a.--Park. setteth forth a meane deuised ballade." 'He gives acurious reason why a young fol. Ill a. nobleman had better be born in London x Fol. 67 a. than any other place. "The shire or y This work is enlivened with a variety towne helpeth somewhat towardes the of little illustrative stories, not ill told, of encrease of honour; as it is much better which the following is a specimen. "An to be borne in Paris than in Picardie, Italian havyng a sute here in Englande to in London than in Lincolne; for that the archbushoppe of Yorke that then was, sometimes now to be found in English composition, among which he censures the excess of alliteration.--" Some will bee so shorte, and in such wise curtail their sentences, that thei had neede to make a mentary immediatelie of their meanyng, or els the moste that heare them shal be forced to kepe counsaile. Some wil speake oracles, that a man can not tell, which waie to take them. Some will be so fine, and so poeticall withall, that to their seming there shall not...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 296 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 16mm | 531g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236622936
  • 9781236622938