History of England from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution in 1688; To Which Is Prefixed, a Short Account of His Life, Written by Himself Volume 6

History of England from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution in 1688; To Which Is Prefixed, a Short Account of His Life, Written by Himself Volume 6

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1822 edition. Excerpt: ... absolutely necessary for her security: and it was obvious that a navy must be built and equipped at leisure, during peace; nor could it possiblybe fitted out on a sudden emergence, when the danger became urgent: yet all these considerations could not reconcile the people to the imposition. It was entirelyarbitrary; by the same right any other tax might be imposed:, and men thought a powerful fleet, though verydesirable both for the credit and safety of the kingdom, but an unequal recompense for their. liberties, which, they apprehended, were thus sacrificed to the obtaining of it. '. England, it must be owned, was, in this respect, un ' Clarendon, vol. 1'. p. 97. May, p. 23.. I Rushworth. vol. 2. p.257, &c. happy in its present situation, that the king had entertained a very different idea of the constitution, from that which began in general to prevail among his subjects. He/did not regard national privileges as so sacred and inviolable, that nothing but the most extreme necessity could justify an infringement of them. iHe considered himself as the supreme magistrate, to whose care heaven, by his birth-riglit, had committed his people, whose duty it was to provide for their security and happiness, and who.was vested with ample and discretionary powers for that salutary purpose. If the observance of ancient laws and customs were consistent with the present convenience of government, he thought himself obliged to comply with that rule"; as the easiest, the safest, and what procured the most prompt and willing obedience. But; when a change of circumstances, especially if derived from the obstinacy of the people, required a new plan of administration, ' national privileges, he thought, must yield to supreme power;...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 286g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236905024
  • 9781236905024